Scientific Program

Day 3 :

  • "Physical Therapy Manual Physiotherapy Strategies Industrial Health and Management Neurological Rehabilitation "
Location: .

Session Introduction

Erika Cyrus Barker

Santa Paula University, Costa Rica

Title: Prescription of exercise in older adults, physiotherapeutic approach
Speaker
Biography:

Erika Cyrus Barker is the Chair Director of Physical Therapy Program, Santa Paula University, Costa Rica and a Physical Therapist with studies in Rehab Sciences. She has completed her PhD in Medical Sciences Research. She has a Master’s degree in Functional Rehabilitation of Elderly Population. She is also a Researcher in the field of functional limitations caused by chronic degenerative diseases.

 

[email protected]

Abstract:

How to correctly prescribe exercise to elderly population was the problem that needed study. The definition states that, from a functional perspective, a healthy old person is one who is capable of facing the process of change with an adequate level of functional adaptability and personal satisfaction. With advanced age, the older adult can reach a state of vulnerability, fragility, which predates and predisposes the individual to disability and functional dependence, hospitalization and death. The fragility phenotype described by Fried et al. 2001, mentioned by Gine'-Garriga et al., identifies a fragile individual when 3 or more of the following criteria are present; unintentional weight loss, muscle weakness, fatigue or low resistance to small effort, slow gait and low level of physical activity. It constitutes a fundamental decision of the prescription phase of any neuromuscular training program aimed at improving or maintaining health. In addition, the correct analysis or multivariate integration of the exercise selection will allow the identification and progression of the same ones whose motor characteristics are common or very similar and therefore constitute exercises similar and interchangeable with each other to cover the same objectives from the point of view of health and functionality. It is important for the physical therapist to know the essential assessments and goals before prescribing exercise to older adults.

Speaker
Biography:

S. Makesh Babu has completed Bachelor of Physiotherapy from The Tamil Nadu Dr M.G.R.Medical University, Chennai and completed Master of Physiotherapy with Specialization - Orthopaedics & Traumatology from Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, India. Currently he is pursuing PhD. He has been in clinical and teaching Physiotherapy for the past 15 years. Presently he is working as Professor in Adhiparasakthi College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India. He has received “Award of Professional Excellence” in 5th National Physiotherapy Conference (2017) Organized by School of Physiotherapy, VELS UNIVERSITY, Chennai, India and had received Dr. M.G. Mokashi “Best Physiotherapist Best Teacher Award” in the National Level Physiotherapy Conference - PHYSIO-CON 2016, Srinagar, India. He is a peer reviewer for the African Journal of Health Sciences since 2008 and has been co-author of research papers for National and International academics. His areas of research interests are Physical Activity, Women’s Health, Orthopaedic and Geriatric Rehabilitation.

Email: [email protected]

Abstract:

Abstract

Physical inactivity is a term used to identify people who do not get the recommended level of regular physical activity. Physical inactivity has a major health impact on the world. In all developing countries, the levels of inactivity are becoming virtually high. Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for the global mortality. Globally, around 31% of adults aged 15 and over were insufficiently active in 2008 (men 28% and women 34%) and approximately 3.2 million deaths each year are attributable to insufficient physical activity. Elimination of physical inactivity would remove between 6% and 10% of the major Non Communicable Diseases of Coronary Heart Disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers, and increase life expectancy. In 2008, prevalence of insufficient physical activity was highest in the WHO Region of the Americas and the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Almost 50% of women were insufficiently active, while the prevalence for men was 40% in the Americas and 36% in Eastern Mediterranean.

41 % of men and 48 % of women being insufficiently physically active in high-income countries compared to 18 per cent of men and 21 per cent of women in low-income countries. Various cross-sectional and longitudinal research have established certain positive relationship between participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) and increase in cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness, weight management, and reduction of adult-like risk factors such as obesity and high blood pressure for chronic diseases. Adults aged 18–64 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity. The current levels of physical inactivity are partly due to insufficient participation in physical activity during leisure time and an increase in sedentary behavior during occupational and domestic activities.

 Recent Publications

WHO: Prevalence of insufficient physical activity (2016) Available from: http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/risk_factors/physical_activity_text/en/

I-Min Lee et al. (2012) Impact of Physical Inactivity on the World’s Major Non Communicable Diseases. July 21; 380(9838): 219–229.

Mendis S, Puska P, Norrving B. (2011) Global Atlas on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Control. World Health Organization (in collaboration with the World Heart Federation and World Stroke Organization), Geneva.

World Health Organization (2010) Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. Available at: http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_recommendations/en/

Görner, K. et al. (2009) Physical Activity, Body Mass, Body Composition and the Level of Aerobic Capacity among Young, Adult Women and Men. Sport Scientific Practical Aspects International Scientific Journal of Kinesiology. Vol.6(2):7-14.

 

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Anum Haider Ladak has completed her MSc from Liaquat National Hospital in Neuro Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. She is working as a Physiotherapist in Aga Khan Hospital, Pakistan.

 

[email protected]

Abstract:

Background: Hypertension is the leading cardio vascular problem worldwide. Hypertension persist in the patient for a long time without any symptom which results in weakening of coronary vessels. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, neuropathy and coronary artery disease. Increased blood pressure and lack of exercise are strongly associated with each other.

Aim & Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of lower limb (cycling) and upper limb exercises (arm stretch trainer) in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

Method: Case control study was performed on 80 participants with the age between 40-60 years. Participants taken for the study were divided into two groups. Group A with 40 participants were receiving upper limb exercises and the Group B with 40 participants were receiving lower limb exercises. Total 10 sessions of both type of exercises were administered.

Result: A statistically significant difference was found in systolic and diastolic pressure before and after the exercises. Systolic blood pressure was reduced to 133.95±4.187 after lower limb exercise and 171.800±5.616 after upper limb exercise. Whereas, diastolic blood pressure was reduced to 84.500±2.83 by using lower limb cycling exercise and 92.27±3.40 by using upper limb exercise. T test result shows p value less than 0.005 of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Conclusion: Both the exercises have impact in reducing blood pressure but patients who want quick recovery should go for lower limb exercises.

Muhammad Usama Khalid

The Pakistan Society for the Rehabilitation of Disabled, Pakistan

Title: Role of footwear in plantar fasciitis
Speaker
Biography:

Muhammad Usama Khalid is currently a student of the five year professional degree program of the Doctor of Physical Therapy.

 

[email protected]

Abstract:

Pakistan is a developing country with 29.5% of the people living below poverty line. Habits of the people are largely diversified. There is no availability of footwear for 15% of the people due to financial constraints and cultural habits. Medical practitioners in Pakistan hardly have digital records, but keep written records. I found it very difficult to interview 10 renowned practitioners in Lahore, but when I did, I was satisfied that 20 patients had been treated by these practitioners. The research concludes that one out of 13 patients visiting physiotherapist or orthopedics complaining about pain in the heel, stiffness and restricted range of motion (ROM), medically called plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is a most common complaint by people with chronic pain under their heels. This was most common in 50% of patients owing to shoes with hard soles, high heels for women, uneven roads, trauma and activities involving weights or in athletes. Plantar fascia is a thick connective tissue (aponeurosis) that supports the arch on the bottom of the foot. It runs from calcaneal tuberosity forward to the head of metatarsal. Due to overuse, plantar fascia can get inflamed. The most common way is to suggest heel pad cushion, slight stretching ultrasonic, cold pack and rest. If not cured, a patient is suggested to use anti-inflammatory drugs. The disease in Lahore is most common among laborers, athletes, diabetics and osteoporotic patients. The disease is most common in women.

Speaker
Biography:

Ibrahim M Zoheiry has completed his PhD from Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University in 2009 and Masters in Physical Therapy for Burn and Plastic Surgery. Currently he is an Associate Professor at Faculty of Physical Therapy, October 6 University and Chairman of Basic Science Department for Physical Therapy. He has published several papers in reputed journals in addition to various books.

[email protected]

Abstract:

Background: Hand repetitive occupational motions have been linked with raised incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) which is characterized by deterioration of median nerve function. A change in wrist & fingers position has been associated with disruption in median nerve function.

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of wrist and fingers position on median nerve distal latency responses in healthy subjects.

Subjects: Sixty healthy participants aging between 30 to 50 years from both sexes were randomly assigned into 1 study group.

Methods: Measurements of median nerve motor distal latency using nerve conduction study from neutral wrist, 60º wrist extension and 60º wrist flexion positions, measurements of median nerve sensory distal latency from fingers extension and fingers flexion positions.

Results: Wrist extension was displayed as the most convenient position as it showed significant difference when compared with other wrist positions. Fingers extension position was displayed as the most convenient position as it showed significant difference when compared with fingers flexion position.

Conclusion: Wrist and fingers extension position was the most convenient position for assessment of median nerve. Both sensory and motor distal latencies were optimized in extension position when compared with other wrist & fingers position. Also preventing repeated and prolonged wrist and fingers flexion may reduce risk of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Speaker
Biography:

So-Hyun Park has received her Bachelor, Master and PhD degrees in field of Physical Therapy from Daegu University in South Korea. She has worked as a Physical Therapist and Researcher at Kyungpook National University Hospital and Yeungnam University Hospital from 2006 to 2012. Currently she is an Associate Professor of the Youngsan University in South Korea and is a Chief Researcher in government funded project. Her major research interests include the lower extremity biomechanics for knee malalignment syndrome, spinal biomechanics and segmental stabilization and gait and posture, etc.

 

Abstract:

Background: Many practitioners recommend step up and step down exercises. However, decreased stability of the hip joint and imbalanced muscle activities can alter the biomechanics during these movements.

Objective: This study investigated muscle imbalance between medial and lateral muscle components and between proximal and distal muscle components by expressing the proportions of muscle activation in the step up and step down positions.

Methods: Nineteen (19) subjects participated. Activities of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, biceps femoris, adductor, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus were assessed.

Results: The semitendinosus and biceps femoris ratio was higher in the step down position than in the step up position. The adductor and gluteus medius, adductor and vastus lateralis, an adductor and biceps ratios were higher in the step up position than in the step down position. The gluteus maximus and biceps ratio was greater in the step down position than in the step up position.

Conclusion: Muscle activation in the medial hamstring is greater in the step down position, in the adductor; muscle activation is greater in the step up position. The step down position is more appropriate for those with proximal weakness, which can promote muscle activation in the gluteus maximus while maintaining biceps femoris activation.

Speaker
Biography:

Dhwani Deepak Dakoria has joined South Gujarat Medical Education & Research Center, S.P.B. Physiotherapy College, Surat in 2011 and completed her Bachelors in Physiotherapy in 2014. She has worked in various hospitals such as BAPS, Unique, Anand, Mahavir Trauma, Ayurvedic, Harekrishna, Prannath, Love & Care, Nirmal Children’s Hospital. Her Internship period spanning 6 months has been recorded at prestigious hospitals such as Shalby Hospitals, Hope Neuro Hopsital and Wockhardt Hospitals. She has commenced her Masters in Musculoskeletal Science in Ashok and Rita Patel Institute of Physiotherapy, which is affiliated by CHARUSAT University.

[email protected]

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A smart phone is a hand-held & pocket-size device which is used by more than 1.5 billion people around the world. Smartphone addiction magnitude in Indian adolescents ranged from 39% to 44% which may affect interpersonal skills, health risks, harmful psychological effects, restricts their hand function because of the phone design layout. In India, limited studies have been reported on smartphone usage and its effects on musculoskeletal problems

Purpose of the Study: The purpose of the study is to determine the association of self-perceived excessive smartphone usage & grip strength in young adults, and, to determine if there is any difference of grip strength of smart phone used hand.

Methods: In this preliminary cross sectional study, 30 college student volunteers of age 19-29 were selected with convenient sampling and divided into 2 groups (n=15 in each group) as per smartphone addiction score–short version (SAS-SV) with cut off score (Group A = SAS-SV Score > 31/60 for males; >33/60 for females & Group B≤31/60 for males and <33/60 for females. SAS-SV and hand dynamometer were used once as an outcome measure.

Findings: There was negative association among SAS-SV score and hand dynamometer score in group A (r=-0.282) and positive association in group B (r=0.120). There was significant association of self-perceived smartphone addiction and SAS-SV score of overall participants (r=-0.567, p=0.001). There was no significant difference in hand dynamometer score of smart phone used and non-used hand in both the group (p>0.05).

Conclusion: The self-perceived excessive smartphone usage is associated with the change in grip strength among young adults. The grip strength of smartphone used hand is not different from the non-used hand.